Hubble captures breathtaking image of an asymmetrical galaxy that was host to a supernova explosion

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Galaxy NGC 2442’s unique shape has led astronomers to name it the “Meathook Galaxy”. It is of special interest to astronomers ever since it hosted a massive supernova explosion that was spotted in 2015, which was visible on Earth for months through even a small telescope.

 NASA’s Hubble Space telescope has captured a breathtaking image of an asymmetrical galaxy that was host to a massive supernova explosion. Galaxy NGC 2442’s unique shape has led astronomers to name it the “Meathook Galaxy”. It is of special interest to astronomers ever since it hosted a massive supernova explosion that was spotted in 2015, which was visible on Earth for months through even a small telescope.

The image was shared by the official twitter account of Hubble Space Telescope. The text accompanying the image read, “#HubbleFriday Because of its irregular shape, the galaxy in this Hubble image is nicknamed the Meathook Galaxy. It hosted a massive supernova explosion that was spotted in 2015, which was visible on Earth for months through even a small telescope!”

The supernova explosion was created by a white dwarf star which was part of a binary star system.  siphoned mass from its companion, becoming unbalanced and triggering a  nuclear fusion that eventually led to an intensely violent supernova explosion, as per a statement by NASA.

A supernova is a powerful and luminous stellar explosion. Most supernovae are triggered by one of two basic mechanisms: the sudden re-ignition of nuclear fusion in a degenerate star such as a white dwarf, or the sudden gravitational collapse of a massive star’s core.

The supernova that occurred in Galaxy NGC 2442 shone brightly for quite some time and was easily visible from Earth through even a small telescope until months later.

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